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South Texas College Department of Mathematics Division of Math, Science and Bachelor Programs MATH 1442- S18-S19-S21 Statistics Syllabus [Fall Semester 2019]   Instructor Information: Instructor Name:     Wai Man Chan Office Location: Sharyland High School 400 building room 411 Telephone #:  956-580-5300, ext. 1151 Email: wchan@sharylandisd.org Office Hours: 9:45 – 11:10 am Monday and Thursday or by an appointment Department Web Page: https://ms.southtexascollege.edu/math/index.html    Department Chair Information: Name of Chair:                           Mario J. Morin Office Location:                        Pecan campus Bldg. J Room 2.804-B Telephone #:            (956) 872-7258 Fax #:                                                            (956) 872-6774 Math Department E-mail Address:       mjmorin@southtexascollege.edu   Course Information: Course Name:           Elementary Statistical Methods Course # and Section Numbers: MATH 1442-S01 Classroom Location: Sharyland High School 400 building room 411 Days and Time class meets: M-F 1:33pm - 2.:18pm   Course Description: This course is a presentation and interpretation of data, probability, sampling, correlation and regression, analysis of variance, and use of statistical software.   Pre-requisite:  Meet TSI college readiness standard for Mathematics; or completion of MATH 0090 or MATH 0200 or MATL 0020 with a grade of “P” or “C” or better, or equivalent.   Program Learning Outcomes: 1. Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of Mathematics, its scope, application, history, problems, methods, and usefulness to mankind both as a science and as an intellectual discipline. 2. Demonstrate a sound conceptual understanding of Mathematics through the construction of mathematically rigorous and logically correct proofs. 3. Identify, formulate, and analyze real world problems with statistical or mathematical techniques. 4. Utilize technology as an effective tool in investigating, understanding, and applying mathematics. 5. Communicate mathematics effectively to mathematical and non-mathematical audiences in oral, written, and multi-media form.   Course Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, students will: Explain the use of data collection and statistical tools to reach reasonable conclusions. Recognize, examine and interpret the basic principles of describing and presenting data. Compute and interpret empirical and theoretical probabilities using the rules of probabilities and combinatorics. Explain the role of probability in statistics. Examine, analyze and compare various sampling distributions for both discrete and continuous random variables. Describe and compute confidence intervals. Solve linear regression and correlation problems. Perform hypothesis testing using statistical methods   Required Core Objectives:   CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS:  to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information. COMMUNICATION SKILLS:  to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication. EMPIRICAL AND QUANTITATIVE SKILLS:  to include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions. TEAMWORK:  to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY:  to include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities. PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY:  to include the ability to connect choices, actions, and consequences to ethical decision-making.     Required Textbook & Resources:   Elementary Statistics: Picturing the World, 7th Edition Larson, Ron | Farber, Betsy Textbook ISBN-13: 9780134683416     Departmental Course Requirements:    Re
Posted by wchan  On Aug 19, 2019 at 7:57 PM
  
SHS Girls Cross-Country 2019 Meet Schedule August 8th Dual Meet Bentsen Palm Park, Mission August 17th Rattler Invitational Ringgold Middle School, Rio Grande City August 24th Dog Pound Invitational San Benito High School, San Benito August 31st RGV Classic Invitational Monte Cristo Golf Course, Edinburg September 7th Mercedes Invitational Mercedes High School, Mercedes September 14th Palmview Invitational Palmview High School, Palmview September 21st Islander Splash TAMUCC, Corpus Christi (top 30) September 28th McNeil Invitational Old Settler's Park, Round Rock October 5th Meet of Champions Donna High School, Donna October 12th Practice 7am-9am OFF October 17th 31-5A District Championships Palmview High School, Palmview October 28th Regional IV Championships TAMUCC, Corpus Christi November 9th State Championships Old Settler's Park, Round Rock Administration Cross-Country Coaching Staff Dr. Mari Vidaurri, Superintendent Melissa Dearth, Head Girls Lori Ann Garza, Principal Mario Garcia, Assistant Girls Richard Thompson, Athletic Director Jorge Guerra, Head Boys Ron Adame, Athletic Coordinator Gilberto Alaniz, Assistant Boys Carmen De La Garza, Athletic Director Secretary Pamela Saenz, Athletic Coordinator secretary Jason Smith, Athletic trainer Andrew Jacques, Athletic trainer
Posted by mgarcia  On Aug 12, 2019 at 12:44 PM
  
Course Description: This course is designed to teach students to be successful mathematical problem solvers. It is a continuation of algebraic and geometric concepts developed in Algebra I and Geometry. Topics covered will be the properties and attributes of functions (linear, quadratic, square root, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and cubic functions) and the multiple representations of all functions mentioned above.  Course Objective: Students will interpret attributes of functions and their inverses. Students will solve systems of equations and inequalities. They will learn properties and apply matrices to systems of equations. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of various methods used to solve quadratic and square root equations and inequalities. Students will apply exponential and logarithmic equations to real life application problems. Students will explore attributes and transformations of cubic, cube root, and rational equations.  Grading Policy:                                                         60% Major Assignments (Exams)                                                                   40% Minor Assignments (Daily Classwork, Homework & Quizzes) **see district grading policy for specifications**  Required Materials:                                          Algebra II Notebook Pencils/Pens Graph Paper  Expectations:  Be on time and be prepared. Bring all materials to class. Be prepared and ready to work as soon as the bell rings. Sit quietly and be attentive while the teacher is addressing the class. Stay in your seat during class time and raise your hand to be recognized. Turn in assignments on time (no late work will be accepted). Ask for any missed work due to an excused absence. If absent during test day, you will be able to take the test before or after school only. Follow all school rules at all times. Stay on task until the bell rings. The teacher dismisses the class, not the bell. Take notes every day and keep a neat and well organized binder. There will be no food or drinks allowed in class.    Course Work Chapter 1 - Functions 1-1 Relations and Functions 1-2 Attributes of Functions 1-3 Function Operations and Composition 1-4 Inverse Functions  Chapter 2 – Absolute Value Equations and Functions 2-1 Absolute Value Equations 2-2 Solving Absolute Value Inequalities 2-3 Attributes of Absolute Value Functions 2-4 Transformations of Absolute Value Functions 2-5 Graphing Absolute Value Inequalities  Chapter 3 – Systems of Linear Equations 3-1 Solving Systems Using Tables and Graphs 3-2 Solving Systems Algebraically 3-3 Systems of Inequalities 3-4 Linear Programming 3-5 Systems in Three Variables 3-6 Solving Systems Using Matrices  Chapter 4 – Matrices 4-1 Adding and Subtracting Matrices 4-2 Matrix Multiplication 4-3 Determinants and Inverses 4-4 Systems and Matrices  Chapter 5 – Quadratic Functions and Equations 5-1 Attributes and Transformations of Quadratic Functions 5-2 Standard Form of a Quadratic Function 5-3 Modeling with Quadratic Functions 5-4 Focus and Directrix of a Parabola 5-5 Factoring Quadratic Expressions 5-6 Quadratic Equations 5-7 Completing the Square 5-8 The Quadratic Formula 5-9 Complex Numbers 5-10 Quadratic Inequalities 5-11 Systems of Linear and Quadratic Equations    Chapter 6 – Square Root Functions and Equations 6-1 Square Root Functions as Inverses 6-2 Attributes of Square Root Functions 6-3 Transformations of Square Root Functions 6-4 Introduction to Square Root Equations 6-5 Solving Square Root Equations  Chapter 7 – Exponential and Logarithmic Functions and Equations 7-1 Attributes of Exponential Functions 7-2 Transformations of Exponential Functions 7-3 Attributes and Transformations of 7-4 Exponential Models in Recursive Form 7-5 Attributes of Logarithmic Functions 7-6 Properties of Logarithms 7-7 Transformations of Logarithmic Functions 7-8 Attributes and Transformations of the Natural Logarithm Function 7-9 Exponential and Logarithmic Equations 7-10 Natural Logarithms  Chapter 8 – Polynomials 8-1 Attributes of Polynomial Functions 8-2 Adding, Subtracting, and Multiplying Polynomials 8-3 Polynomials, Linear Factors, and Zeros 8-4 Solving Polynomial Equations 8-5 Dividing Polynomials 8-6 Theorems About Roots of Polynomial Equations 8-7 The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra  Chapter 9 – Radical Expressions 9-1 Roots and Radical Expressions 9-2 Multiplying and Dividing Radical Expressions 9-3 Binomial Radical Expressions 9-4 Rational Expressions  Chapter 10 – Cubic and Cube Root Functions and Equations 10-1 Attributes and Transformations of Cubic Functions 10-2 Attributes of Cube Root Functions 10-3 Transformations of Cube Root Functions 10-4 Cube Root Equations  Chapter 11 – Rational Functions and Equations 11-1 Inverse Variation 11-2 Transformations of Reciprocal Functions 11-3 Asymptotes of Rational Functions 11-4 Rational Expressions 11-5 Adding and Subtracting Rational Expressions 11-6 Solving Rational Equations                    Academic Dishonesty   All work that you turn in is to be your work; under no circumstances shall a student attempt to turn in work that is not their own. Cheating and plagiarism are serious crime committed in the classroom and will not be tolerated. Violators will receive a grade of zero on that assignment, and an office referral.
Posted by wchan  On Aug 08, 2019 at 5:39 PM
  
District Grading Guidelines     Click on the link below to access the District Grading Guidelines.  If you have any questions, contact the counseling department or administration of Sharyland High School.     Sharyland ISD Grading Guidelines   effective 2013-2014 school year
Posted by andriaalvarez  On Sep 20, 2016 at 8:56 AM 156 Comments